Ten architectural projects of students at the University Academy of Arts

An aquarium designed to protect marine biodiversity and a healing center that uses horticultural techniques to help treat mental illness are included in our latest school show of architecture students from the University’s Academy of Arts.


Other projects include a “public living room” that combines neighborhood life with privacy areas and a residential center designed to provide residents with economic self-sufficiency.


School: University Academy of Arts, School of Architecture
Courses: M.Arch M.Arch2 B.Arch MA and BA
Teacher:
Mark Mueckenheim, David Gill, Nicole Lambrou, Sameena Sitabkhan, Eoanna Harrison, Philip Ra, and Mini Chu

School statement:

“We are a laboratory for progressive design of extremely passionate students and a prominent faculty of architect practitioners working together to explore the boundaries of architecture. Our interactive field experience and online study use digital tools to mentor students through our rigorous curriculum.

“We offer excellent design education by developing each student’s ability to synthesize critical thought, architectural vision and technical understanding. Our programs address current global issues, empowering students to bring change and leaders advocating for social equality. Our diverse international community allows us to spread a unique cultural response to build a better world. “


External Mission Library – a knowledge connector for fast-changing communities, Yi Hsien Rachel Wang

“The typology of library buildings has evolved throughout history, reflecting changes in information systems and learning activities. By combining social, functional and environmental benefits, the thesis projects a new sustainable typology of libraries as a prototype of public learning infrastructure.

“The main conceptual idea is to design the library as a continuous ramp, connecting previously separate areas in a diverse local urban fabric. Architectural intervention shortens the physical and social distance of the neighborhood by combining pedestrian bridges, casual and formal learning infrastructure as public living space for residents to gather. they work, exercise and have fun. “

Student: Yi Hsien Rachel Wang
Course: Master of Architectural Thesis
Teacher: Mark Mueckenheim


Exhibition of the School Academy of the University of Arts

Self-generating architecture: Gat 28, Valeryia Haletskaya

“The design of the hybrid aquarium and R&D center on Pier 28 on the San Francisco coast employs organic, metabolic and self-generating materials. Artificial organisms – protocells that eventually grow into artificial limestone – help reduce carbon dioxide levels while strengthening existing structures and building reefs, skeletons and the sea wall envelope.

“Researchers, students and visitors share spaces for learning, interaction and collaboration. The scheme offers protection to marine species and enhances biodiversity. Live architectural intervention is targeted as a long-term solution for coastal cities and other areas at risk of storms. Due to climate change.”

Student: Valeryia Haletskaya
Course:
Master of Architectural Thesis M.Arch
Teacher:
Mark Mueckenheim


Exhibition of the School Academy of the University of Arts

External blend Explores the development of mixed use as a means of fostering a healthy year-round community at the Outer Cape, Christian Fish

“The lack of affordable year-round accommodation has become an emergency crisis in Cape Cod, affecting low- and middle-income families, depending on the mostly seasonal economy. Outer Mix envisions a new 10-acre residential, social and economic center in the Eastham Corridor special district.

“Organized in four repetitive blocks across the site, 95 housing units are combined with nearly 30,000 square feet of economic and social program. This includes art studios, co-working spaces, cafes, a library, kindergartens and greenhouses in the community. This combination of programs enables economic and sustainable self-sufficiency and community for residents. “

Student: Christian Fish
Course:
Master of Architectural Thesis
Teacher:
Nicole lambrou


Exhibition of the School Academy of the University of Arts

Ecotexture – combining ecology with architecture, Kevin Brady

“How can architecture improve, enhance and support educational and public awareness of the preservation and conservation of our local natural resources? Exposure and access to elements of nature enliven the spirit, arouse curiosity and encourage a response to ‘critical thinking’, promoting a healthy interactive lifestyle.

“This thesis seeks to identify how architecture could positively impact an ecological environment that strengthens community health, productivity, conservation and environmental awareness. This approach to design engages user groups with the natural environment while preserving the ecological habitat.”

Student: Kevin Brady
Course:
Master of Architectural Thesis
Teacher:
David Gill


Exhibition of the School Academy of the University of Arts

Living architecture by Aishwarya Naidu Bobbili

“This project is a healing center that incorporates soil and plants into its shape and structure to create a holistic, sustainable space for wellness and rehabilitation. Agriculture, nature and architecture form a dialectical relationship. Horticultural techniques such as help treat mental illness and serve as therapeutic strategy.

“Located in Bakersfield, near Oil City in Kern County, California, the site is near the most polluted city in the United States. The project aims to help treat people in a peaceful environment that includes sustainable and biophilic design.”

Student: Aishwarya Naidu Bobbili
Course:
Master of Architectural Thesis
Teacher:
Mark Mueckenheim


Exhibition of the School Academy of the University of Arts

Unique Pavilion for Northridge Cooperative Housing Naomi Rojas, Shunyi Yang, Dylan Ingle, Rhonuel Domingcil, Fabio Lemos, Corona Xiaohuan Gao, Malak Bellajdel, Kenta Oye, Jacob Delaney, Harikrishna Patel and Daniel Cervantes

“The design project of the B.Lab Group, the pavilion encourages cooking, eating and storytelling in the community garden in the Hunters Point neighborhood of San Francisco.

“Due to the lack of access to healthy, affordable food in the area, the pavilion integrates desks, benches and a movable kitchen table to demonstrate cooking from products directly from the garden, while a range of frames offers shade and a view of the bay.

“The design was derived from several communities and youth workshops, along with feedback from volunteers from the garden, and the pavilion was measured and tested on full-size prototypes before construction.”

Student: Naomi Rojas, Shunyi Yang, Dylan Ingle, Rhonuel Domingcil, Fabio Lemos, Corona Xiaohuan Gao, Malak Bellajdel, Kenta Oye, Jacob Delaney, Harikrishna Patel, and Daniel Cervantes
Course:
B Arch Collaborative Project / Building Lab – b.Lab / ARH 498
Teacher:
Sameena Sitabkhan, NOMA and Eoanna Harrison, AIA


Exhibition of the School Academy of the University of Arts

Application form Daniel Joonhee Lee

“The project explores the relationship between the sacred and the political, and the role of the autonomous citizen in it. The application forms are simple and contractual.

“Where public services are exchanged, they activate devices that bring citizens together to achieve common goals. Sacred architecture has become a beacon of alternative governance becoming a haven and political action.

“This thesis frames these events as separate from the economic agenda of neoliberalism. The application paper re-imagines a place with an urban shrine in Tenderloin, San Francisco, where nonprofit staff and community members live and work at the center of collective activities.”

Student: Daniel Joonhee Lee
Course:
Graduated architectural work
Teacher:
Philip Ra and Mini Chu


Exhibition of the School Academy of the University of Arts

Kid of Parts for Bayview Commons Apartments, Adam Nuru, Markish Siojo, Dylan Ingle, Fabio Lemos, Xiaohuan Corona Gao

“Through a series of community events at Bayview Commons Apartments, a community of affordable residential buildings in San Francisco, we learned that residents want an active, intergenerational, and flexible space that allows for relaxation, interactive play, and community events.

“Our final design includes a set of flexible, movable furniture that can be placed in a variety of configurations. Intergenerational play, imagination and socializing are accentuated by the design of various panels on modular parts. The colorful landscape is coded giving clues to spatial use and providing a vibrant surface that complements wall colors frescoes. “

Student: Adam Nuru, Markish Siojo, Dylan Ingle, Fabio Lemos, Xiaohuan Corona Gao
Course:
B Arch collaborative project / Building Lab b.Lab / ARH 498
Teacher:
Sameena Sitabkhan, NOMA


Exhibition of the School Academy of the University of Arts

Filling the Void of Kent Oya

“Urban planning in San Francisco has limited ethnic neighborhoods to inhuman spaces. My ancestral heritage includes the repeated displacement of the Japanese community to unwanted or forgotten territories.

“The design reveals the lost layers of the site – where the first Japanese city came to life in 1900 – by activating the streets, offering a cultural center that borrows from museum programs and immigration centers.

“The act of making it was a catharsis that allowed this community to get creative. Galleries of pottery, wood and sewing were paired with neighboring workshops, providing spaces for gathering, exchanging ideas and sharing experiences through craft.”

Student: Kenta Hey
Course:
Graduated architectural work
Teacher:
Philip Ra and Mini Chu


Exhibition of the School Academy of the University of Arts

Urban living room Zoe Qiaoyu Zheng

“The project introduces neighborhood life into the public space while simultaneously erasing boundaries and creating conditions of privacy. Public programs and diverse open spaces connect traditional libraries and private spaces with neighboring buildings.

“The design responds to natural light, wind and views, but also creates opportunities to block visual contact with neighboring residences. People are welcome to celebrate their time here, and the architecture sets invisible boundaries to protect their personal space as needed.

“This isn’t just a library or another place to hang out; the proposal also provides opportunities for people to communicate safely in an acceptable vicinity.”

Student: Zoe Qiaoyu Zheng
Course:
Graduated architectural work
Teacher:
Philip Ra and Mini Chu


Content of the partnership

This school show is a partnership between Dezeen and the University Academy of Arts. Learn more about the content of the Dezeen partnership here.

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